The Permanent Way by Stanhope Forbes

Stanhope Forbes’ poster ‘The Permanent Way’ is unusual among railway posters in that it doesn’t show an idyllic holiday destination or stylish engine whooshing through a scenic landscape. It shows the railway workers who kept the lines running; laying, checking and relaying track. It shows the men moving a rail into position while a train moves towards us, about to pass a signal box and the group. The combination of people in the foreground – eight or ten men, struggling to move the rail into the correct position, themselves carefully aligned with the rails and the line of perspective diminishing towards the back of the poster – and the train speeding towards the viewer, gives the poster depth and energy, and the lookout in the front right of the poster serves to draw the viewer into the scene.

Poster, The Permanent Way by Stanhope Forbes for the London, MIdland & Scottish Railway, 1924

Poster, The Permanent Way by Stanhope Forbes for the London, Midland & Scottish Railway, 1924

Forbes designed the poster for the London, Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) in 1924. The LMS had commissioned 16 Royal Academy artists to make posters for their new campaign, the brainchild of acclaimed poster artist Norman Wilkinson.

A set of photographs from the LMS official collection gives us a unique insight into the production of the poster. One photograph shows the artist at work with his sketchbook, and others record the scenes and people he was sketching.

Stanhope Forbes R.A. sketching from life for the poster 'The Permanent Way'.

Stanhope Forbes R.A. sketching from life for the poster ‘The Permanent Way’.

The photographs show that the poster is a composite of elements which Forbes sketched from life. Forbes recorded the details of the workmen, their faces, clothes, posture, as well as keeping small details such as the chalk writing on the rail lifter and the inspector with coat draped over arm. In other places he employed artistic licence, shortening the coat of the lookout, adding in the factory to the right hand side, the oncoming train. The setting seems to have been changed to make the scene more interesting, with the preferred location also photographed – although not as yet identified, suggestions appreciated.

I’d love to be able to see the pages of that sketchbook; to see how those initial observations evolved and grew into the poster that was presented on the hoardings. Here are some more of the photographs showing the scene that Forbes was sketching that day.

Permanent way workers laying new rail, 1923.

Permanent way workers laying new rail, 1923.

Inspector Goodyear

Inspector Goodyear

Permanent Way track laying, lookout, 1923.

Permanent Way track laying, lookout, 1923.

Permanent way workers laying new rail, 1923.

Permanent way workers laying new rail, 1923.

Permanent Way main line showing signal cabin, 1923

Permanent Way main line showing signal cabin, 1923

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3 Responses to The Permanent Way by Stanhope Forbes

  1. Julian Hills says:

    It is rare to see maintenance teams photographed and gives an insight to the sheer hard labour involved in such operations. Fascinating to see the apparatus used as well as the clothing worn by the various ‘ranks’ and must not forget the portrait of the artist who one must presume is the reason we have this photographic record!
    Was Forbes the photographer also I wonder?

  2. Greg Tingey says:

    Reminds me of an early Cuneo painting: “On Early Shift” [ Greenwood box, 1948 ]

    • Julian Hills says:

      I’d never seen ‘On early Shift’ before, very evocative, on a par with ‘Clear Road Ahead’ .

      Thank you for bringing it to my attention.

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