Category Archives: Railway History

Named locomotives in the First World War

The naming of railway locomotives has often been a practice heavy with symbolism and at no time more so than during the Great War. Thanks in part to a sustained campaign in the press a wave of anti-German sentiment swept … Continue reading

Posted in Railway History, Research and archive

Ribblehead Viaduct – the real ‘Jericho’

The first episode of ITV’s new period drama Jericho having aired last night [Thursday 7 January 2016], concentrating on the building of the Ribblehead Viaduct in the 1870s – one of the last great Victorian railway construction projects. Dipping into … Continue reading

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Bullet train, Chinese locomotive and the rail renaissance

When George Osborne came to the National Railway Museum earlier this month to launch the National Infrastructure Commission he gave his speech in front of KF No.7 built for export to China and only a couple of steps away from … Continue reading

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‘A high entertainment standard’ – films from our archive at the 2015 Aesthetica Short Film Festival

This post was written by Tim Procter and Angelique Bonamy of our Collections and Research Team. We are dealing with a type of film that is in every respect far removed from the ‘feature’ film production of the Elstrees, Denhams … Continue reading

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Back to Irk Valley with the L&Y signalling school

Our Lancashire & Yorkshire (L&Y) signalling school, the world’s oldest operating model railway, returns to home territory this coming Saturday (7th November) with a look at the Irk Valley crash of the 15th August 1953.

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Eccentric Engineering: discoveries from the branch lines of railway technology

This blog was written by Tania Parker and Jack Garside, our archive volunteers. Like all modern technologies, the railways have come a long way from their origins. The evolution of railway engineering has not just been a linear triumphal march from … Continue reading

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Tobacco and comforts for wounded railwaymen

This blog is written by archive volunteer Robert Demaine. Our First World War volunteer team have now been working for a year to add more information to our list of fallen railwaymen. This has involved in depth research into our … Continue reading

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The Borders line is back

On the day the Queen celebrated being our longest serving monarch she enjoyed a train ride. No ordinary train ride, but one that is a potent symbol of the rail renaissance that is happening now across Britain. The Borders railway re-opening … Continue reading

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“Old Morality” and the rise of recreational reading

We have recently acquired some interesting publications from W.H. Smith & Son. You may wonder why as, on the face of it, the railway connection is rather tangential. However, this famous stationers and bookshop has been part of the station landscape since … Continue reading

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Prisoners of the Red Desert: Wartime Adventures of LNWR railwaymen

We have now added over 1800 new entries to our list of  railwaymen who died in the First World War, you can see our list of over 20,000 men on our website. Our research demonstrates that not all railwaymen spent … Continue reading

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